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Nautical Art

We traveled to South Korea for the last half of April and spent two weeks with my daughter, son-in-law, and their kids. So while the yard was unable to launch us in early April (we were blocked in by other boats) we decided to wait until we got home. We arrived home on Thursday 2 May, and Cay of Sea was launched the next morning.

                     Hangin’ in the the slings

 

My artist-wife’s interpretation of the launch. That’s me in the blue shirt (what, didn’t recognize me?).

 

                           Down in the water

I scrambled on board to check for leaks as she hung in the slings. All’s well (after a super quick adjustment of the stuffing box), and off we go to test the new prop.

First impressions of the new prop: lots of speed for a little rpm, and a lot more torque than the two-blade prop provided (although it wasn’t bad). But . . . I’ll have to have the pitch adjusted (decreased). I can achieve hull speed at 3200 rpm, but the engine is rated to rev at 3600. That means the engine works a bit too hard, although I’m not getting any black smoke at any rpm, which is good news. So there’s another date with the travel lift in the near future.

Two days ago, I spent a couple of hours cleaning the interior – almost done with the visible stuff.  I’ve still got the quarter berth to empty and clean. Then I want to go through all the lockers and clean and reorganize.

Because I needed an emergency haul-out last fall, I didn’t get a chance to do the normal fall maintenance, so I still need to change the oil. I’m going to change out the transmission oil this time too, and adjust the intake/exhaust valves, plus drain and refill the “fresh water” cooling circuit. Then I start on renewing some of the varnish, especially anchor platform, as the finish has completely failed on it. Last year I acquired a 50-foot length of anchor chain, which is more than twice has much as is currently on the rode, so I’ll install that as well.

Finally, I’ve included a page from Ruth’s travel journal. In particular, the last day of the trip when we were on the plane for 12 hours.  I think you will enjoy it.

We couldn’t sit next to each other, and we were in the middle seats of the middle row. I sat directly behind her. All told, it was a 28-hour travel day.

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We were invited out for a ride on a friend’s 41 foot down east-style yacht to view the race in mid-fleet, as it were. We had a wonderful afternoon/evening of looking at and photographing beautiful, fast yachts sailing in pretty gusty conditions. I’ve posted a few photos below – if you’re like me, looking at photos of beautiful sailing yachts is almost as good as sailing.  Enjoy!

DSC_5087 DSC_5091 DSC_5094 DSC_5097 DSC_5100 DSC_5106 DSC_5113 DSC_5119

I’ve “known” Bob Salnick for about a year.  We “met” when he contacted me about reblogging selected posts I’ve written.  He compiles the blog Small Boat Projects which showcases “small” boat projects (the projects are small, not the boats, necessarily. . . ).  The premise of his blog is that “every boat owner has found ways to make life in that small space easier, more comfortable, more convenient.”  He scours the web for sailing, boat owner, and project sites looking for material of appropriate scope to “re-publish.”  In doing so, he provides a tremendous service to boat owners looking for solutions and ideas, and to boat bloggers who are always looking for a wider readership.

Now, however, I “know” Bob in person.  We met yesterday in his home port of Anacortes, Washington.  We are visiting our son and his wife on Whidbey Island, which is 50 miles south of Bob’s mooring.  So we are arranged a lunch date and spent a few hours together talking about boats, kids, sailing, maintenance, music (Bob’s also a guitar player), and the live-aboard life he and Jane have enjoyed for quite a few years.

Of course, Bob also owns a boat.  Well, not exactly.  He actually owns a drop-dead gorgeous yacht-home made by Down East Yachts.  His yacht Eolian is a DE45 ketch-rigged model.  This is a design that recalls an era of grace in yachts that seems to have fallen out of favor today.  The photos below will give you a small sample of this wonderful yacht, and the loving care Bob lavishes on her.  For a much better set of photos please click on the overview he has written in his own blog Windborne In Puget Sound

Marina photos are never very complimentary.  The detail, beautiful shear and perfectly proportioned coachroof are not view to best advantage with all the background noise in this pic.

Marina photos are never very complimentary. The detail, beautiful shear and perfectly proportioned coachroof are not viewed to best advantage with all the background noise in this pic.

I love the bronze dolphin!

I love the bronze dolphin!

As you can see, she's a real head-turner.

As you can see, she’s a real head-turner.

Bob invited us aboard after lunch and we were treated to a tour. Again, while I took a few photos, his (linked above) are much better. Like many of us who have owned old boats for a number of years, Bob has been into every system on board, and repaired or upgraded most of them.  His particular knowledge of the Down East 45 seems encyclopedic, and his general knowledge regarding yacht maintenance, repair and improvement is deep and seasoned with experience.

We had a wonderful afternoon of conversation and visiting. Thanks Bob, for your friendship, warm welcome to me and Ruth, and for your great service to yacht owners and bloggers.

At home in his environment - Bob in the saloon of Eolian.

At home in his environment – Bob in the saloon of Eolian.

Demonstrating his Voyage-Air guitar.  The perfect boat guitar.

Demonstrating his Voyage-Air guitar. The perfect boat guitar.

This guitar has a giant sound for its size, and due to its short scale, it plays like an dream.

This guitar has a giant sound for its size, and due to its short scale, it plays like a dream.

Bob and Rick

Bob and Rick

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