A Week In Maine

I’ve been to Maine twice before, but only briefly – both were quick overnight business trips. I was active duty Navy and flew in and out two separate times. I saw the Navy base (stayed overnight in the barracks) and a little bit of the coast line from the windows of the aircraft (not many windows in most military aircraft, from a passenger’s perspective).

This week Ruth and I are vacationing in Rockland – and about this point in reading, you may be wondering how this post supports the theme of a “sailing blog,” especially one proclaiming it focuses on Chesapeake sailing. You have a valid point. This and the next couple of posts won’t have anything to do with Chesapeake sailing, but will feature this well-known harbor and some of the boats –  both sail and power – seen here.

While this is November and many boats are hauled and covered for the winter, there is still a lot to see, boat-wise. The harbor itself is beautiful, and the town is an historic sailing and lobstering locale.

Here's a classic plastic that hasn't been hauled yet. Hope they don't wait too much longer. By this time last year, they had a foot of snow.

Here’s a classic plastic that hasn’t been hauled yet. Hope they don’t wait too much longer. By this time last year, they had a foot of snow.

Some of the work boats are still on their moorings. There are many moorings in the harbor, and floating piers that are hauled seasonally.

Some of the work boats are still on their moorings. There are many moorings in the harbor, and floating piers that are hauled and launched seasonally.

We walked around town a good bit today, and enjoyed for lunch the best clam chowder I’ve had since we moved away from the Seattle area. We had a lobster roll too.  Wow – so good!

Typical of high latitudes, the tidal range is large, as you can see from this photo. 10 feet is not uncommon.

Typical of high latitudes, the tidal range is large, as you can see from this photo. 10 feet is not uncommon.

We walked through the boat yard to get a better photo of the harbor (at least that’s what I told Ruth). Fun to look at all the boats from deck to keel. This is one of the big schooner harbors. 60 – 95 foot-long wooden schooners with two to three masts.  Several were hauled and in the yard as we walked through. I was impressed with the scale of these boats, and their massive wooden spars lying horizontally on supports. Most of the big wooden schooners, however, will winter-over in the water, cosseted against the snow and rain. I now realize that I failed to get a photo of any of them – floating or hauled. l’ll remedy that in the next day or so.

I like looking at the hardworking lobster boats, with their lines refined by decades of experience, working in every kind of weather.

This one looks more like a yacht-finished lobster boat than a work boat. Still, a good looker, though.

Although this one looks more like a yacht-finished lobster boat than a work boat, a closer look reveals the pot puller on the starboard side. She’s a good looker.

Ruth spent half an hour sketching the harbor at the waterfront park. The park is adorned with retired aids to navigation, and it was interesting to see the these massive devices up close.

DSC_4847

This appears to be a whistle buoy, and I think that long shaft must be part of the piston mechanism that drives air through the whistle in response to wave-induced motion. It’s enormous. The whole device must be 20 feet from top to bottom.

A mushroom anchor, apparently, keeps these aids in place. Wish I had Ruth standing beside it for scale, because it's a giant.

A mushroom anchor, apparently, kept these aids in place. Wish I had Ruth stand beside it for scale, because it’s a giant.

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2 comments
  1. Wow, really glad we don’t have 10 ft tides here on the Chesapeake Bay, I can’t imagine trying to secure our boat lines for such an extreme change!

    • Most of the docks and marinas have floating piers. When we lived in western Washington (Puget Sound area) the tidal range – minimum to maximum – was about 12.5 feet. We got used to walking up and down those steep gangways onto the floating piers where our boat was tied up.

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