No More Dragging Anchor (I hope)

I thought it would look massive on the sprit, but it doesn't.

I thought it would look massive on the sprit, but it doesn’t.

A visit to Bacon’s Sails and marine consignment unearthed a used Delta 33#.  That’s just about the size I’ve been looking for. Purchased for $100, I’m hoping this will signal the end of my anchoring problems at about half-price what a new Delta would cost.

Now I admit that this is still something of an experiment. Will it hold through big wind shifts? The test data seems to indicate that in wind shifts of 90 degrees or more, they tend to break out. Also they are best used in mud and sand, so for an all-round anchor it will not be the answer, but for the Chesapeake, it likely will be just fine in our mud bottoms. Regardless, the test data I looked at indicated that it performed best of all the “old generation” ground tackle, which includes all other plow-types (CQR), Claw (Bruce), fluke-types (danforth, Fortress, etc.), and fisherman.

I will say this: One drag on this anchor, and I will get rid of it. I’ll bite the bullet then, and buy a Rocna or a Manson Supreme. The test data on these new generation anchors is superb. I know. . . why am I even messing around with the old styles? Well, cost is always a factor. Rocna and Manson are pretty pricey. And, I’m confident that this is a very large step up from my 13 lb Danforth.

We’ll see. . .

What kind of anchor do you use, and why?  Are you satisfied with its performance?

A problem immediately apparent is how to secure it to the platform.  It's wobbly.  The chain is secured with line to the bow cleat, and I tied a loop on the cross piece, passed it under the roller back up behind the roller, over the shank, then down to the pad eye on the platform.  It's secure now.

A problem immediately apparent is how to secure it to the platform. It’s wobbly. The chain is secured with line to the bow cleat, and I tied a loop on the cross piece, passed it under the roller back up behind the roller, over the shank, then down to the pad eye on the platform. It’s secure now.

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4 comments
  1. Alan C. Wilson said:

    Yeah, It was the Rocna that I thought you owned. My mistake. I do so wish I had bought a 25,27,29/30 instead of the W33. It has become too much boat for us!
    Sincerely Alan W.

    • Yes, the larger the boat, the larger the issues in handling, parking, outfitting, maintaining – the effort and cost seem increase exponentially with every additional two feet of length.

  2. My PDQ 32 originally had a 25-pound Delta, and it was not enough for “Kleenex mud,” as you have called it. But with 10 more pounds and much less windage, I would feel good about it. That said, keep that Danforth handy for V-tandems when in real “Kleenex.”

    I wouldn’t worry much about shifts; lab tests generally feature fast shifts. In the real world, this is a good anchor, not prone to tripping in good bottoms. I never had that problem. However, the 25-pound delta would drag in about 20 knots in very soft mud (never in sand). If we assume you have 50% of the windage, that wind force goes up with the square, and that anchor holding is linear with mass, then I would expect dragging at about 35 knots. In other words, it will hold about the same as the Danforths but with much better tracking ability.

    • Thanks for your perspective, Drew. Makes me feel more confident about the Delta. The back-up 13# danforth lives in the stern locker with its rode in a canvas bag – ready to deploy.

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