Dinghy Refit Complete

“Refit my dinghy” is so easy to say, but represents a deceptively large effort. This always surprises me: the boat is only 8 feet long, after all. I’ve been doing dinghy refit things for a month now – I began on 30 April, and I finished yesterday – 30 May – so every day for a month that I’ve had time, weather, and inclination converge on the same day, I’ve worked through necessary steps. Since my last post I’ve painted the shear stripe (twice – 2 coats), reinstalled the hardware (oar locks, pintles and gudgeons, bow ring) and lashed on the firehose rub rail. I did anticipate that lashing on the firehose would take a while, but forgot just how long (about 2 hours). Amazing really – such simple task, yet so time consuming to get it to look right and lash down tightly.

DSC_4455

The sheer stripe turned out a little wider this time. For some reason I felt like the stripe needed to be as wide as the joint at the bow transom. Now I’m not so sure.

Firmly pressing down the tape, it turns out, is really important. . .

Firmly pressing down the tape, it turns out, is really important. . .

. . . and here's why. This one-part polyurethane tends to be very thin, and easily gets under any imperfection in the tape seal.

. . . and here’s why. This one-part polyurethane paint is very thin, and easily gets under any imperfection in the tape seal. I did go around the boat one last time to press down the tape firmly. Fortunately, with a wooden boat there is always “next time” so next time I’ll use a better grade of tape.

But from 6-8 feet away it's difficult to notice the imperfections.  That's fine. My goal isn't perfection here, it's preservation, functionality, and general respectability.

But from 6-8 feet away it’s difficult to notice the imperfections. That’s fine. My goal isn’t perfection here, it’s preservation, functionality, and general respectability. Perfection takes a lot more time and effort than I’m willing to give.

Lashing the firehose.  Part of what takes so long is pulling 50 feet of line through each hole.

Lashing the firehose. Part of what takes so long is pulling 50 feet of line through each hole.

Binding the hose tightly and neatly is the challenge.

Binding the hose tightly and neatly is the challenge.

Once done, though, there is no better rub rail in the world. This covers and cushions everything, and the hose casing cleans up really well. These sections of hose have lived outside at least ten years, and they easily scrubbed up bright again.

Once done, though, there is no better rub rail in the world. This covers and cushions everything, and the hose casing cleans up really well. These sections of hose have lived outside at least ten years, and they easily scrubbed up bright again.

I like how well the hose covers the corners. Extra protection is needed at the corners because of point loading - as the hose turns the corner, extra material gathers and provides that extra cushion.

I like how well the hose covers the corners. Extra protection is needed at the corners because of point loading – as the hose turns the corner, extra material gathers and provides that extra cushion.

I didn’t anticipate uncured green paint in a few of the lashing holes. That left traces of green on the cord and hose. My final task for the day was sanding the seats and applying varnish (first coat of many to come) to protect the epoxy sealant from UV damage. She’s now ready for Ruth to paint the name on the transom

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8 comments
  1. Anonymous said:

    Nicely done Rick. Turned out looking really sweet. The sheer stripe looks fine also, not too big.

  2. Anonymous said:

    Oops! Anonymous = Tom Ward, s/v La Vida Dulce

    • Thanks Tom. I’m not displeased with the result, but always a bit disappointed with the inconsistencies and errors.

  3. Ells said:

    looks great, Dad!!!

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