Launch Day

I recommissioned the engine yesterday – installed a new raw water pump impeller and o-ring gasket, installed the water pump onto the engine, and replaced the raw water feed hose.  I had replaced the hose last year as well, but ended up cutting the length of hose too short.  This put a slight crimp in the hose because the bend it had to make to connect to the pump was too small of an angle.  I corrected that today by using a section of hose that is half again as long.  Now it’s just one long loop. I suppose the culprit is the aft-facing strainer outlet.  Were it angled towards pump inlet, the hose could be a shorter length.  No matter – this will work with no issues.

Looks a little long, but there are no crimps in the hose now.

Looks a little long, but there are no crimps in the hose now.

The yard crew painted the where the stand pads were, the bottom of the keel, and any other spots they saw that I missed!  I also missed the outboard surface of the garboard drain plug because it wasn’t installed when I was painting the bottom.  The yard crew suggested I should fire the guy who painted the bottom this year!

Unpainted garboard drain plug.  They crew fixed me up while gently pulling my leg.

Unpainted garboard drain plug. The crew fixed me up while gently pulling my leg.

With a band saw, Scotty (one of the boat yard employees) trimmed off a shaft zinc so that it would fit in the narrow space I have left between the prop and the cutlas bearing.

There's the space for the zinc.  A one-inch zinc is too big, so they cut off a quarter inch or so of the zinc, then fitted it on there.

There’s the space for the zinc. A one-inch zinc is too big, so they cut off a quarter-inch or so off the zinc, then fitted it to the shaft.

After launch it took me a few minutes to get the raw water strainer cap tightened in such a way for it to stop dripping.  I must need a new gasket for it.  After several tries and adjustments, I got it sealed up.  The engine started readily, and I let it idle while I got ready to pull out of the temporary slip.  I placed my ladder on deck, took my dinghy under tow, and headed across the creek for my home slip.

Sitting in the slings waiting for me to check all the through-hulls.

Sitting in the slings waiting for me to check all the through-hulls.

Now I’ll start my round of annual maintenance, including replacement of fuel filters, clearing cockpit drains, rebuilding several manual pumps on board, and probably replacing the batteries.  I also have some varnish to freshen and Cetol to renew, and I’m going to replace the drinking water hoses this year:  they’ve become fouled with hard water deposits.  I still have to put the marine toilet pump back together as well – I treat this like I do the raw water pump on the engine and disassemble it for the winter, storing the rubber parts in a sealed plastic bag.

I feel like I got a year off with respect to recommissioning.  I didn’t have a big boat yard project to complete this year, so the recommissioning spanned only two days.

Home at last.

Home at last.

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