Operations Locker Part IV

Digging through my left-overs and wood scraps, I realized that I had some other un-milled teak that I could use for the locker door trim.  This is dense, heavy material, and I think it’s teak.  I bought it at Sailor’s Exchange years ago, when I still had some store credit, and used some of it to build the teak fore-hatch on Cay of Sea.  If I ripped strips off of one side of this lumber, it would be much safer than trying to re-mill the piece of decking I had in mind.  The width of the board gave me the perfect dimension for the trim.

It was easy to rip strips off of one side of the board.

It was easy to rip strips off of one side of the board, and with no safety hazards.

Before sanding and smoothing.

Before sanding and smoothing.

No fasteners for these thin pieces.  Just glue.  The challenge is clamping in the right location.

This glue takes about an hour to set up an initial bond.  I had three different periods where I just had to wait for the glue to cure before I could move on to the next piece.

This glue takes about an hour to set up an initial bond. I had three different periods where I just had to wait for the glue to cure before I could move on to the next piece.

Three sides of the first door done.  I got one strip done on the remaining door also.

Three sides of the first door done. I got one strip done on the remaining door also.

You’ll have to wait for the next post to see the doors trimmed out, as I ran out of daylight today.

A few weeks ago, while worrying over my batteries, I struggled with the old Blue Sea analog volt meter that was on the boat when we bought her.  It doesn’t give very accurate information, and is wired up with a poor connection.  Not sure why I’ve put up with it this long, as I’ve long thought it would be a simple matter to connect a cheap digital volt meter from Harbor Freight (or some such place) and have it “permanently installed” with the use of a bracket, running wires directly to the the battery bank selector switch.

I began work on that today, cutting tiny little pieces of plywood and trim for the bracket, sized to fit the volt meter.

Little bits of trim to fashion the bracket.

Little bits of trim to fashion the bracket.

There are no clamps that will hold this stuff together - it's too small.  So a couple of straight scraps lightly nailed down to the work surface provide a brace points.  The wedge-shaped pieces provide the clamping pressure.

There are no clamps that will hold this stuff together – it’s too small. So a couple of straight scraps lightly nailed down to the work surface provide brace points. The wedge-shaped pieces provide the clamping pressure.

Wax paper keeps me from glue it all to the work surface.

Wax paper keeps me from glue it all to the work surface.

My old meter looks something like this, except my has fancy red highlights that show different charging voltages for different battery types.

My old meter looks something like this, except mine has fancy red highlights that show different charging voltages for different battery types.  $45 for this.

$10 for a digital volt meter?  Sounds good to me.  If it had "marine" stamped on it somewhere, you'd pay $45.

$10 for a digital volt meter? Sounds good to me. If it had “marine” stamped on it somewhere, you’d pay $145.

Have to glue one piece of trim on at a time.  This is a little fussy, but who’s in a hurry?  I’ve waited 10 years to change this on my boat – guess I can wait a few more days to glue and clamp all the pieces together.

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4 comments
  1. Tate said:

    That is the exact volt meter I have. It works well but the leads for the probes actually fell apart internal to the wires, so be gentle with them.

    • Thanks for the warning, Tate. That’s been my experience with other multimeters too – probe-to-wire connection fails, or the probes push into the plastic handle.

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