Varnish Round III and More Cockpit work

I’ve finished the bulk of varnish.  All that remains is to install bungs in the top step over the fasteners, then re-coat several times, and re-coat each step several more times to extend the finish life against traffic wear.  I need to think about a non-skid surface on the steps as well.  Varnished wood that is wet with rain water is slippery underfoot.

Final Coat of varnish done.

Final coat of varnish done.

I installed the required notice regarding oil discharge with a dab of 3M 4000 on the right and left sides of the back of the sign.

I am so relieved to have finally refinished the teak trim around the countertop.  It has bothered me for years.

Guess I needed a good reason to thoroughly sand and varnish the trim.  Unless I was refinishing the all the teak in this area, it hardly seemed like it would be noticed or make any impact.

Guess I needed a good reason to thoroughly sand and varnish the trim. Unless I was refinishing the all the teak in this area, it hardly seemed like it would be noticed or make any impact at all.

DSC_2122I finally finished installing the rudder bracket.  As I anticipated, access was the key difficulty.  Having to drill through the bracket from underneath, using the pre-machined holes as a location guide was the principal difficulty.  I discovered that it was very difficult to determine when the drill was perpendicular to the surface being drilled.  Lying on my side beside the rudder stock, holding the drill at the end of my reach with my left hand and pushing up – I managed to get the holes drilled, but the angle of all the holes (at least I’m consistent) aims slightly forward – maybe 5 degrees off of perpendicular.  Oh well – it’s not noticeable from above, except that one pair of holes isn’t exactly parallel.  None of my work is perfect, and this is another example of that.  I need to clean the cockpit and tape off the margins, then apply new non-skid paint.  That will bring the cockpit project to a close.  I will not worry about the rudder stock or the upper bearing anymore.  No photos from beneath for this phase – but I’ve reposted the photo of the new rudder bracket temporarily installed, nicely painted with rust-resistant John Deere yellow.

Temporarily mounted rudder bracket.  Like the color?

Not shown in this photo, the bracket is now permanently bolted in place.

Through-bolted bracket.  I engaged the assistance of one of my dock neighbors to turn the bolt heads from above, while I held the nut from beneath.

Through-bolted bracket. I engaged the assistance of one of my dock neighbors to turn the bolt heads from above, while I held the nut from beneath.

My plan for today was to clean the interior, but I had obligations morning and afternoon, and it will have to wait.  For several days, in fact, as rain is forecast until Wednesday.

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4 comments
  1. Ryan said:

    Looks great!

  2. Lookin’ good!

    One old-timey way to make non-skid is to sprinkle salt in your final varnish coat (perhaps masked to define a non-skid area). Once the varnish sets, wipe off the salt with a wet rag…

    • Thanks Bob. That’s the solution I was looking for. I had seen that sometime in the recent past, but couldn’t remember exactly what the process was, nor that it was salt that was used to create the non-slick surface.

      Thanks again!

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