Moving in the Right Direction

Amazing what three hours’ work will accomplish – and how it makes you feel.

A busy morning with church, then lunch, then – sigh – back to the boat for more chaos abatement.  I started the work by washing, then grinding the new epoxied patch in the cockpit sole.  I mixed up some epoxy thickened with West System 407 fairing compound, and applied it to the patch, bringing up nearly even with the rest of the cockpit sole.  Before I show you photos, I have to confess these are all taken with my phone – it’s just too dusty for the DSLR – and besides, I forgot to take it with me!

I left mixture a little thinner so it would flow into the low spots.

I left the mixture a little thinner so it would flow into the low spots.

Leaving that to cure, I went below and continued setting up the tackle for moving the engine – I had actually started this yesterday, but realized it was too ambitious for the time remaining.  First I reinstalled the exhaust riser, applying the gasket dressing and tightening the bolts snug.  Now with the afternoon ahead of me, I concentrated on working out  the mechanical purchase.  First, I needed to learn how to operate the come-along I had purchased for this task.  It took about 10 minutes for me to understand how to release the ratcheting mechanism.  It has two interlocked releases, and I just couldn’t understand how they locked and/or released the drum.  But having conquered that challenge, I rigged the cable up to the boom over the companionway, using a floating seat cushion to protect the boom, and another one to protect the companionway furniture.

Come-along cable rising to the boom.

Come-along cable rising to the boom.

I used the boom vang tackle to pull the engine – still resting on heavy timbers – aft to the engine compartment.  A combination of upward and lateral force, along with a guiding nudge from my hands or feet along the way moved the 200+ pound engine to the opening.  I secured the boom vang inside the engine compartment and took a strain on the line, which resulted in moving the engine aft a few inches at a time.

Lines set up to move the engine.

Lines set up to move the engine.

Vang hooked onto the overhead inside the engine compartment.

Vang hooked onto the overhead inside the engine compartment.

Here's a better picture of where the vang is attached inside.

Here’s a better picture of where the vang is attached inside.  There used to be a fuel tank access port here, since covered by the new cockpit sole.

I switched purchase from the rear lifting point to the forward lifting point on the engine as I got nearer the compartment opening.  That proved to be too much forward lift.  Eventually, I rigged a line between them, and lifted from the middle – that seemed to be just about right.

Here I'm lifting the back of the engine over the compartment sill.

Here I’m lifting the back of the engine over the compartment sill.  At this point, I had to move the lift to the front lifting point, just forward of the valve cover.

Now inside the compartment, I still need to move the engine aft to line up with the bolt holes.

Line rigged from both lifting points.  Now inside the compartment, I still need to move the engine aft to line up with the bolt holes.

Starboard side mounts: as you can see I need to nudge the engine left, and back about four inches.

Starboard side mounts: as you can see I need to nudge the engine left, and back about four inches.  Sorry about the photo!

Port side

Port side

Almost there.

Almost there.

Tomorrow I’ll nudge it into place with a 2×4 and pry bar as levers, then bolt it down.  Hopefully, the alignment won’t be too far off, and I’ll be able to get lined up pretty quick.  I was careful to keep the mounts at the same hight, so it I think just port and starboard alignment, and perhaps a bit of hight adjustment due to the new section of timber on the starboard side.  We’ll see. . .

In all, this wasn’t very difficult, and . . . I feel great about the progress!  I expected to be overmatched, strength-wise, but strength was not an issue because there is no horsing around a piece of iron like this.  It’s too heavy, and space is too restricted.  You have to use other means of force to move it.

Credit goes out to MainCruising who posted a video of this kind of installation on Youtube here.

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5 comments
  1. Tate said:

    Awesome work. Bet it feels good to have that puppy back in its home.

    • Thanks Tate. Yes, it feels like I’ve turned the corner with this project.

  2. Jim Brewer said:

    You make it look easy Rick, good luck with nudging.

    • Thanks Jim! It was remarkably easy. I really expected a struggle, but it turns out, all I needed was patience.

  3. Jan Sopoci said:

    It seems that we have a new “Dr. Watson, I presume?” in our midst!!!, LOL.

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