Moving Towards Engine Remount

Today was an odds and ends day.  Early on, I drove to the machinist’s shop and picked up the rudder bracket.  He had “cold-coated” it with a zinc galvanizing spray, and I have continued the spray protection with a zinc chromate spray.

There's a lot more material in this bracket than the one I took off!

There’s a lot more material in this bracket than the one I took off!

The machinist took the holes pattern from the old bracket.

The machinist took the holes pattern from the old bracket.

I then reassembled the prop shaft elements, which I had taken apart the day prior.  Here are a series of photos with the parts in various stages of assembly and cleaning.

The stuffing box - on the left, the part that contains the stuffing has been cleaned on a wire wheel, while the other half, at right, has not.

The stuffing box – on the left, the part that contains the stuffing has been cleaned on a wire wheel, while the other half, at right, has not.

Here's that right half cleaned up.

Here’s that right half cleaned up.

Old packing withdrawn from the packing nut.  It was only two years old and not in too bad shape.  However, there were only three rings of packing, and I replaced it all with four new rings.  Now it should last at least 5 years.

Old packing withdrawn from the packing nut. It was only two years old and not in too bad shape. However, there were only three rings of packing, and I replaced it all with four new rings. Now it should last at least 5 years.

The coupling end of the prop shaft.  Boy, that looks ugly.  I don't know when you should replace a prop shaft, but there is a fair amount of corrosion and some scoring and pitting on this one.  I'll reinstall it one more time.  It doesn't seem to eat up the cutlass bearing.

The coupling end of the prop shaft: Boy, that looks ugly. I don’t know when you should replace a prop shaft, but there is a fair amount of corrosion and some scoring and pitting on this one. I’ll reinstall it one more time. It doesn’t seem to affect wear on the cutlass bearing.

Shaft coupling with key.  I had to buy a gear puller to get it off the shaft.  It cleaned up well on the wire wheel.

Shaft coupling with key. I had to buy a gear puller to get it off the shaft. It cleaned up well on the wire wheel.

The polished flange cleaned up without flaw under the wire wheel.

The polished flange cleaned up without flaw under the wire wheel.

Here's the shaft and coupling reassembled with the hose in place on the stuffing box.

Here’s the shaft and coupling reassembled with the hose in place on the stuffing box.  I assembled all the metal parts with a water-proof lithium grease.

Now reinstalled in the shaft log on board.  The hard part was convincing the hose it really had to go further up on the stern tube.

Now reinstalled in the shaft log on board. The hard part was convincing the hose it really had to go further up on the stern tube.

I also bought a couple of missing fasteners for attaching the engine mounts to the engine – those were the ones that vibrated out.  This time I included split washers, so hopefully they’ll stay in place this time.  I bought a couple more lag bolts for attaching the engine mounts to the beds, then marked the bed with the appropriate engine mount to drill the new hole.  I also filled a couple of old, unused holes in the engine bed with thickened epoxy.  When I reinstall the exhaust riser, I’ll be ready to remount the engine.  I had taken it off to get the engine out, but have since discovered that I can remount the engine with it in place.  It is much easier to reinstall the riser when the engine is not in the engine compartment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2 comments
  1. Nice work Rick. You’ve really done a lot here and done it well. Hope to see you out there on the water soon.

    • Thanks Tom. I’m just about ready to stop being a shipwright and start being a sailor again. I hear your mods are completed and you’re back in the slip – congratulations.

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