Sunday Daysail

I didn’t know how perfect the conditions were until we were on the bay.  Southeast winds 10-15, temperature 75-80 degrees.  It couldn’t have been a better day.

We got on the water about 1515 after church and lunch out with friends.  We close-reached east for about 5 nautical miles before turning around.

Just perfect sailing

Just perfect sailing

Fish traps benefit the birds opportunists that they are.

Fish traps benefit the birds opportunists that they are.

On our way back we passed the fish trap pictured above, just in time to see an osprey dive on a fish and struggle back into the air with it.  If you click the photo to enlarge it, you can see that about half the birds on those posts are osprey.

There was a fair amount of sailboat traffic, even late in the afternoon.  The wind strength was just on the edge of calling for a reef in the sails.  Although we weren’t overpowered, I did need to maintain a fairly strong grip on the helm.

These folks rolled up their headsail part of the way

The larger the boat, the larger the crew. There are 6 people in the cockpit of this boat.

We returned to the pier at about 1745, having sailing more than 10 nautical miles.  Fantastic 2.5 hours.

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5 comments
  1. David Patterson said:

    Sounds (and looks) like a perfect day on the water :)

    • Thanks David. It was the kind of day sailors live for.

  2. I love and find interesting the osprey photo. Pretty cool, and shows they are pretty smart! Coming home several weeks crossing Chesapeake Bay Bridge, I saw 8-9 osprey at the end of the bridge eastern side all practically bumping into each other in the sky as they tried to fish directly below. I was guessing a huge school of fish was present and they were having a grand time. :-) Usually, an osprey has a screaming fit when another even gets near them. Focusing on intense fishing must mellow them around others, lol.

    • Thanks for the visit, Donna. It is really interesting to watch the osprey fish and raise their young. As we go by the navigation markers upon which the birds build their nests, the adults squeak at us, and worry us with their voices, fearing we will invade their nests. The little fuzzy hatchlings (now not so little) bump into each other and poke their heads up. The adults are amazing fishers. I wish I had eyes like theirs… they can see through the water from far up, dive on fish, and come up with a catch nearly every time.

      We’ve had a batch of cat birds in our trees and yard for about a month, and I finally got to see what kind of bird has that song(s). Amazing vocalizing, their plain appearance seems mismatched with their spectacular songs.

  3. Thanks for the visit, Donna. I never tire of watching them.

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